International Shipping Glossary of Terms

AES

The Automated Export System (AES) allows electronic filing of the Shippers Export Declaration (SED) and ocean manifest information directly to U.S. Customs.

Automated Export Declaration Filing

ASTM

ASTM International is one of the largest voluntary standards development organizations in the world and a trusted source for technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services. Known for their high technical quality and market relevancy, ASTM International Standards have an important role in the information infrastructure that guides design, manufacturing and trade in the global economy.

air freight

Transportation of goods or product by airplane. Lower shipping costs may apply for certain commodities and destinations.

air waybill (airbill)

A shipping document used by the airlines for airfreight. A non-negotiable contract for carriage that includes carrier conditions such as limits of liability, shipping instructions, a description of commodities, and applicable transportation charges.

all cargo aircraft

An aircraft dedicated to the carriage of cargo only, rather than the combination of passengers and cargo.

ALSC

The American Lumber Standards Committee (ALSC) is comprised of manufacturers, distributors, users, and consumers of lumber. It serves as the standing committee for the American Softwood Lumber Standard and in accordance with PS 20 administers an accreditation program for the grade-marking of lumber. In addition, the ALSC administers accreditation programs for the quality marking of treated lumber for the labeling of wood packaging material produced under the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) Guidelines for Regulating Wood Packaging Material in International Trade.

ancillary charges

Supplemental or additional charges levied over and above the quoted freight rate for transportation. Ancillary charges range from services such as two-man pick-up or delivery, lift-gate, and inside customs clearance, bunker adjustment fees, currency adjustment fees, on-carriage and value added taxes.

bill of lading

The bill of lading (BOL) is a document issued by the carrier to a shipper, signed by the captain, agent, or owner of the vessel, furnishing written evidence regarding receipt of goods (cargo), the conditions for transportation (contract of carriage), and the engagement to deliver goods at a prescribed port of destination to the lawful holder of the bill of lading. The BOL is a receipt for merchandise and a contract to deliver it as freight. There are many different types of bills of lading.

block & brace

Blocks are cut pieces of dimensional lumber which are typically fastened to the top deck of the structure or inside of a container. They are used to provide a railing around the edge of the product to block the product in place preventing shifting from side to side or front to back during transit.

Bracing also prevents the lateral movement of the product within the container. Braces are secured to the interior walls and at times the inside top of the container.

CAD

Computer-aided design is the use of computer-based tools that assist engineers, architects and other design professionals in their design activities. Our staff utilizes CAD for wood crate design and review with your local crating company.

cargo insurance

Insurance against loss and loss-by-damage to, or destruction of, cargo. Covers risks to goods and means of transportation involved in the transporting of goods over land or by inland waterways. Insurance on land-only shipments by truck or train, to or from places in the US, is usually considered to be inland marine insurance.

charter (air)

A lease or agreement to hire aircraft for the transport of goods to one or more destinations

charter (ship)

A ship leased by its owner or agent for a stated time, voyage or voyages.

commercial invoice

The commercial invoice is a bill for goods from the seller to the buyer. These invoices are often used by governments to determine the true value of goods for the assessment of customs duties. Governments requiring the commercial invoice to control imports often specify its form, content, number of copy, language, and other characteristics.

consignee

The person or company named in a freight contract to whom goods have been shipped to for delivery or care.

container

A single rigid, sealed, reusable (metal) box in which product is shipped by vessel, air, truck or rail. Containers are designed and constructed to withstand normal stresses applied during regular transport.

container (air)

Air freight containers or ULDs (unit load devices) are made in different sizes and shapes to fit unique requirements of airplane holds. They conform to standards established by the International Airline Transport Association (IATA).

container (ocean)

Ocean shipping containers are generally 10, 20, 30 or 40 feet in length, 8 feet wide and 8 or 8, 5 feet high and conform to International Standards Organization (ISO) standards. Container types include: standard, high cube, hard top, open top, flat, platform, ventilated, insulated, refrigerated, and bulk.

corrugated box and container

Corrugated fiberboard, or combined board, has two main components; the linerboard and the medium bonded together by adhesives. Both are made from a heavy paper called containerboard. Linerboard is the flat facing that adheres to the medium. The medium is a wavy paper called a flute that is found between the linerboards. Corrugated is a durable, versatile and lightweight material used for custom-manufactured shipping containers. We use as a minimum 350 lb. Double Wall corrugated fiberboard which is made up of three sheets of linerboard with two mediums or flutes in between when building custom corrugated boxes.

crate (wooden)

A wood crate is a structural framework of members fastened together to form a rigid enclosure, which protects the contents during handling, shipping and storage. The enclosure is usually of square or rectangular design and may or may not be sheathed. With design and structural criteria based on strength, transportation hazards, lumber, fasteners, and space for product requirements, the effective engineering of crates for specific purposes becomes effective.

cradle

A cradle is U shaped in design, built to support and contain the unique requirements of cylindrical objects. Two or more cradles are mounted to a skid, pallet or load base; the base may or may not be covered with a sheathed enclosure.

cushioning systems

The quantity and density of cushioning materials such as polyethylene or polyurethane foams are determined based on the item characteristics as applied to density, shock value, drop, vibration, and recovery. Inadequate or improper use of cushioning products can damage or destroy the product during normal transportation conditions.

dock

A loading or unloading platform at an industrial location or terminal. The space or waterway between piers for receiving a ship.

door to airport

Shipping service from shipper’s door to the destination airport for pick up by consignee.

door to door

Shipping service from shipper’s door to the destination door. The originating carrier may spot (place) a container outside of shipper’s facility for loading by and at the expense of the shipper. The delivering carrier may place the container or goods outside of the consignee’s facility for unloading by and at the expense of the consignee.

door to port

Shipping service from shipper’s door to port of destination. The originating carrier may spot (place) a container outside of shipper’s facility for loading by and at the expense of the shipper. The container will be transported by the shipper to the nearest agreed upon destination port or port of discharge. Not to be confused with destination, this may be a point inland.

dunnage

Loose packaging material used to secure freight during transportation. Dunnage can be used to keep product away from container walls, to separate products, as a void fill, to reduce shifting and to minimize abrasion. In ocean shipping dunnage refers to packing, typically wood, used to support, block and brace cargo within a container in order to keep the cargo from moving. May be wood, plastic, metal or air bags.

economy three to five day

Also referred to as deferred air usually moves on a space available basis and is not guaranteed to arrive on a given date or time.

export

An export includes all product, good, or commodity, transported from one country to another country in a legitimate manner. Export of goods requires involvement of Customs and other Government authorities in both the country of export and import.

Important note to exporters: ISPM 15 requirements apply to all coniferous (softwood) and non-coniferous (hardwood) packing materials including dunnage. U.S. Inspection Agencies control the issuance of the ALSC Quality Mark and the presence of the Quality Mark ensures WPM produced in the U.S. and destined for export meets the importing countries regulations.

export

http://www.bis.doc.gov/Licensing/exportingbasics.htm

export packing list

An export packing list is more detailed than a domestic packing list. The list contains itemized information in each individual package and indicates the type of package such as a corrugated box, wood crate, or drum. The list also shows the individual net, legal tare and gross weights and measurements for each package. Package markings should be noted with shippers and buyers references. U.S. and foreign customs officials may refer to the list to check the accuracy of the cargo.

first article inspection

First Article Inspection Report is a requirement placed on the supplier by the customer. The report documents and certifies that each first article unit delivered to the buyer was produced and inspected in accordance with the buyers specifications. The report includes all physical, material, and chemical test data associated with the part. These reports are provided to the buyer and kept on file by the supplier for a minimum of seven years or as required by the buyer.

FMCSA

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration was established as a separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) on January 1, 2000, pursuant to the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999. The Primary mission of the FMCSA is to reduce crashes, injuries and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. The FMCSA develops and enforces regulations for motor carrier (truck and bus) safety.

freight

Goods, cargo, product or lading transported for pay by land air or water. Goods or merchandise for transportation. Items shipped fall into various categories depending on item description, size and weight.

full container load (FCL)

A shipment of cargo that fills a container by bulk or load. The term typically refers to ocean containers.

full truckload (FTL)

A shipment of cargo that fills a given container either by bulk or weight. Shipments larger than about 15,000 pounds are typically classified as “truckload” (TL). Truckload shipments may be up to 40,000 pounds or 53’ long. Full truckload shipments typically travel as the only shipment on a trailer and deliver on the same trailer as they are picked up on.

harmonized code

A multipurpose international goods classification system used for classifying goods moving in international trade under a single commodity code.

IATA

The International Air Transport Association is the prime vehicle for inter-airline cooperation in promoting safe, reliable, secure and economical air services for the benefit of the world’s consumers.

incoterms

Ex Works (EXW) – the seller/exporter makes the goods available to the buyer/importer at the sellers/exporters door. Title, risk, payment of transportation and insurance pass to buyer at the seller’s door.

Free Carrier (FCA) – the seller/exporter delivers the goods export cleared to a carrier named by the buyer. Title, risk, transportation and insurance pass to buyer when the seller delivers the goods to the carrier named by the buyer.

Free Alongside Ship (FAS) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and then places them alongside the vessel at the named port of shipment. The parties may stipulate in their contract that the buyer will clear the goods for export. Title, risk, payment of additional transportation and insurance pass to buyer once the goods are delivered alongside ship by the seller/exporter/manufacturer. Used only for sea and inland waterway transportation. Used only for ocean or inland waterway transport.

Free On Board (FOB) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for the costs and risks of delivering the goods past the ships rail at a named port. Title, risk, payment of additional transportation and insurance pass to buyer once the goods are delivered on board the ship by the seller/exporter/manufacturer.

Cost and Freight (CFR) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for the costs and risks of delivering the goods past the ships rail at a named port of shipment. The seller is responsible for paying the costs associated with transport of the goods to the named port of destination. However once the goods pass the ships rail at the port of shipment, the buyer assumes responsibility for risk of loss and damage as well as any additional transport costs. Used only for ocean or inland waterway transport.

Cost, Insurance and Freight (CIF) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for delivering the goods past the ships rail at a named port of shipment. The seller is responsible for paying the costs associated with transport of the goods to the named port of destination. However once the goods pass the ships rail at the port of shipment, the buyer assumes responsibility for risk of loss and damage as well as any additional transport costs. The seller is also responsible for procuring and paying for marine insurance in the buyers name for the shipment. Used only for ocean or inland waterway transport.

Carriage Paid To (CPT) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export, delivers them to the carrier, and is responsible for paying for carriage to the named place of destination. However, once the seller delivers the goods to the carrier, the buyer assumes responsibility for all additional costs risk of loss and damage as well as any additional transport costs including title, risk, insurance and transportation to destination. Used for any mode of transport.

Carriage and Insurance Paid To (CIP) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export, delivers them to the carrier, and is responsible for paying for carriage and insurance to the named place of destination. However, once the goods are delivered to the carrier, the buyer is responsible for all additional costs. Used for any mode of transport.

Delivered At Frontier (DAF) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for making them available to the buyer at the named point and place at the frontier, not unloads and not cleared for import. Naming the precise point, place and time of availability at the frontier is very important as the buyer must make arrangements to unload and secure the goods in a timely manner. Frontier can mean any frontier including the frontier of export. However, once the goods are delivered to the frontier, the buyer is responsible for all additional costs. Used for any mode of transport.

Delivered Ex Ship (DES) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for making them available to the buyer on board the ship at the named port of destination, not cleared for import. The seller is responsible for all costs associated with getting the goods to the named port of destination prior to unloading. However, once the goods are delivered to the named port the buyer is responsible for all additional costs. Used for ocean or inland waterway, or by multimodal transport where the final delivery is made on a vessel at the named port of destination.

Delivered Ex Quay (DEQ) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for making them available to the buyer on the quay (Warf) at the named port of destination, not cleared for import. The buyer therefore assumes all responsibilities for import clearance, duties, and other costs upon import as well as to the final destination. Used only for ocean or inland waterway.

Delivered Duty Unpaid (DDU) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for making them available to the buyer at the named place of destination. The buyer assumes all responsibilities for import clearance, duties, administrative costs, and other costs upon import as well as transport to the final destination. Used for any mode of transport.

Delivered Duty Paid (DDP) – the seller/exporter/manufacturer clears the goods for export and is responsible for making them available to the buyer at the named place of destination, cleared for import, but not unloaded from the transport vehicle. The seller, therefore, assumes all responsibilities for delivering the goods to the named place of destination, including import clearance, duties, and other costs upon import. Used when the named place of destination is other than the seaport or airport.

inventory list

A document prepared by the shipper listing the kinds, quantities and values of the merchandise in a particular shipment. Crating companies require an itemized inventory prepared by the shipper for all shipments domestic and International. The inventory or packing list is instrumental for establishing not only the type, and quantity but also for establishing value per item in case of lost or damages during handling and transportation.

ISO

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is the world’s largest developer of standards. Although ISO’s principal activity is the development of technical standards, ISO standards also have important economic and social repercussions. ISO standards make a positive difference, not just to engineers and manufacturers for whom they solve basic problems in production and distribution, but to society as a whole. The ISO Standards are specific to a particular product, material, or process. However, the standards that have earned the ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 families a worldwide reputation are known as “generic management system standards”.

ISPM15

International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures No. 15 require all solid wood packing material to be heat treated and stamped with an official mark. ISPM 15 requirements apply to all hardwood and softwood (coniferous and non-coniferous) packaging materials. The standard does not apply to wood packaging made wholly of manufactured wood products such as plywood, particle board, oriented strand board, or products created using glue, heat and pressure or a combination of these.

The second alternative, Fumigation with Methyl Bromide (MB), while still acceptable is being phased out because of environmental reasons. The fumigator must be registered in the program in order to issue the ALSC Quality Mark.

Important note to exporters: ISPM 15 requirements apply to all coniferous (softwood) and non-coniferous (hardwood) packing materials including dunnage. U.S. Inspection Agencies control the issuance of the ALSC Quality Mark and the presence of the Quality Mark ensures WPM produced in the U.S. and destined for export meets the importing countries regulations.

EXPORT – APHIS – Wood Packaging Materials Export Information (ISPM 15)

EXPORT – Countries Requiring ISPM 15 Compliance

NAPPO – North American Plant Protection Organization – USA/Canada/Mexico

labels and marks

All shipping containers such as wooden crates and corrugated boxes must be labeled identifying consignee name and destination address. The package may also be marked with handling and shipping instructions identifying the contents and or warnings such as Keep Dry, This Side Up, Lift Here and Center of Gravity. The handling instructions are typically done with standard pictorial markings and symbols recognized worldwide. In the U.S.A. refer to ASTM Standard D5445 for over 30 symbols and reference ISO 780 for International markings and symbols.

less than container load (LCL)

A shipment of cargo that does not fill a container and is merged with cargo for more than one consignee or from more than one shipper. A container may be packed with LCL cargo at a container freight station usually at port of departure.

less than truck load (LTL)

A shipment weighing less than the weight or volume for the application of a truck load rate which is merged with cargo for more than one consignee or from more than one shipper. The product must be crated and or palletized for a mixed-freight environment which is intermingled with other shipments on a single piece of equipment and typically unloaded and reloaded across multiple pieces of equipment during the transport. LTL represents the majority of “freight” shipments and are often referred to as “motor freight.”

load base

The purpose of a load base also referred to as a pallet is to support the product load, and consolidate and contain the product or unitized loads during transportation and handling. The most commonly used load base (pallet) in the United States is the stringer pallet with a footprint of 48” by 40” allowing either two-way or four way entry. Your crating company may design and build custom load base pallets for the specific product, allowing ease of handling and transportation of most any size and weight.

load stabilizer

A wide variety of materials and methods are used to stabilize the load during handling and transportation; in order to minimize shifting which would subject the product and or equipment to damages. Stretch-wrapping, heat-shrink, metal and nylon banding, adhesives, air bags, slip sheets, kick-blocks, and bracing are some of the methods.

logistics

Logistics is the overall management of relocating resources to where they are required. It involves the integration of transportation, inventory, warehousing, handling, packaging, crating, pick-up and delivery.

material handling

A multitude of methods used for moving material during handling or transportation. Material may be moved by man power such as lifting or hand trucks, or by mechanical means such as cranes, boom, forklift and other lifting mechanisms.

motor freight

Motor freight is the transport of freight or goods by truck or motor vehicle.

museum packaging and crating

The combination of conservation handling, preparation and packaging of items such as paintings, paper, stone, plaster, furniture, wood objects, textiles, and other materials, to meet or exceed museum and conservation standards; in order to protect the items during storage, handling and transportation. The type of product, risk, age, condition, climate, humidity and temperature conditions at origin, during transport and destination; and considerations for shock and vibration during handling, storage and transportation are factored into the packaging design.

next day

The act of transporting cargo or freight overnight for delivery or availability the following (next) business day; next day usually moves by air but may be accomplished by ground (hot shot) depending on the distance.

ocean freight or sea cargo

A freight service for transporting your products over the sea or ocean by vessel commonly referred to as a steamship. The three means of shipping products by ocean vessel are; bulk, break-bulk, and containerized. The means you select depends on the type of cargo you are shipping, the size of the shipment and the handling. Ocean transportation takes longer than shipments by air, but the cost of transportation can be lower.

ocean (marine) insurance OMI

OMI (ocean marine insurance) covers the interests of shippers, consignees, distributors, and others in goods and merchandise shipped primarily by water or, if in foreign trade, also by air. Note: In the us, marine insurance is defined so broadly as to have resulted in a division of the field into 2 branches- inland (or dry) marine and ocean (or wet) marine. What is called “ocean marine insurance” in the US is known internationally as “marine insurance. OMI (ocean marine insurance) is principally associated with oceangoing vessels and their cargoes. It also covers international air shipments as well as transportation by land or air that connects with an international ocean or air shipment.

Ocean Transportation Intermediary (“OTI”)

OTI’s are either Ocean Freight Forwarders (“OFF)” or Non-Vessel Operating Carriers (“NVOCC”). An Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) is an individual or company located in the U.S. which:

  • arranges cargo movement to an international destination
  • dispatches shipments from the United States via common carriers and books or otherwise arranges space for those shipments on behalf of shippers
  • prepares and processes the documentation and performs related activities pertaining to those shipments
Prior to Offering Services in the U.S. Trades, OFFs:
  • are required to obtain a license from the FMC (46 CFR § 515.3)
  • are required to submit proof of financial responsibility for payment of claims (46 CFR Part 515 Subpart C) arising from transportation-related activities
A Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVOCC) is:
  • a common carrier that holds itself out to the public to provide ocean transportation, issues its own house bill of lading or equivalent document, and does not operate the vessels by which ocean transportation is provided
  • a shipper in its relationship with the vessel-operating common carrier involved in the movement of cargo
Prior to Offering Services in the U.S. Trades, NVOCCs:
  • are required to obtain a license from the FMC (46 CFR § 515.3) (if a U.S.-based company)
  • are required to submit proof of financial responsibility for payment of claims (46 CFR Part 515 Subpart C) (arising from its transportation-related activities
  • are required to publish a tariff (46 CFR § 520.3)
(source: Federal Maritime Commission website at fmc.gov as of 12/2015)

one of container

The design and build of one specific container made of wood, corrugated or a combination of the two materials for the containment of products.

on site

The act of performing all preparation, packaging and crating of the item/s or freight at their place of origin; such as a factory, plant, warehouse, office or medical facility.

off site

The product is picked up (as is) without packaging and transported to our warehouse facility where the preparation and packaging for transportation takes place.

packing list

A document prepared by the shipper listing the kinds, quantities and values of the merchandise in a particular shipment. A copy is required for all shipments domestic and international and a copy is usually sent to the consignee. The packing list sometimes called an inventory is instrumental for establishing type, quantity and value of the shipment.

pallet

A low portable platform with or without sides used to handle, store, ship, transport and move materials and goods. Pallets or load bases are usually constructed of wood and can be built to any specification in order to support most loads of varying size and weight distribution.

plant moves

The relocation of all items and equipment from a manufacturing facility. This scope of work may require special equipment such as lifts and cranes to facilitate the removal and loading of the heavy machinery. Custom load bases, pallets, skids, saddles, cradles, and crates may be required in order to transport or move the product to final destination.

POA

Power of Attorney is a written legal document by which one person (principal) authorizes another person (agent) to perform stated acts on the principal’s behalf. Exporters give limited power of attorney to their freight forwarder authorizing the agent to sign export contracts and documents for transportation.

product and transportation analysis

The study of the products characteristics which include size, weight and weight distribution, internal and external materials, susceptibility to abrasion and corrosions, the effect and characteristics of compression, vibration and shock, and it fragility. Also, the consideration of handling, distribution, mode of transportation, and origin and destination factors are used to develop product specific engineered packaging.

production run containers

To build multiple amounts of a specific container typically done under contract or through a purchase order.

pro forma

An informal document presented in advance of the arrival or preparation of the required document in order to satisfy a requirement, usually a customs requirement.

project management

The organization and management of resources to deliver all the work required to complete a temporary project within a defined scope, time and cost.

PU&D

PU&D is the acronym for pick-up and delivery relating to the transportation industry.

reverse logistics

Reverse logistics is the process of moving goods backwards from their final destination for the purpose of capturing value, reintroduction into the chain, or proper disposal. Asset recovery, remanufacturing and refurbishing, reusing containers and recycling packaging materials, returned merchandise due to damage, seasonal inventory, restock, salvage, recalls, and excess inventory may be included in the definition of reverse logistics.

rigging

Applying techniques and use of slings, hooks, chains, rope, hoist chains, hitches, blocks and pulleys in combination with load, weight and center of gravity factors along with cranes, lifting equipment, derricks and hoists for moving large, heavy products.

Routine schedule

Regular or routine scheduled air comprises companies engaged in air transportation of passengers and or cargo on a regular time schedule covering established pre-defined routes.

same day

The act of pick-up, packaging if required, transportation and delivery of product or goods during the same day.

Schedule B

Schedule B codes are used to classify the different types of products exported from the United States. Every export item is assigned a unique 10-digit identification code and every 10-digit item is part of a series of progressively broader product categories. Schedule B numbers are required for all export items.

SED

The Shippers Export Declaration (SED) is a form required by the export authorities to document an export of goods. This form is required for all U.S. Export shipments with a declared value greater than $2,500.00. Also required for shipments requiring a U.S. Department of Commerce validated export license or U.S. Department of State License regardless of value.

skid

A portable platform supported by two or more parallel runners that elevate the platform for lifting with mechanical equipment. A skid differs from a pallet in that it is generally higher and does not have additional cross members, stringers, as support beneath the runners. Skids are used to support the load and assist with storage, handling and transportation.

SLI

The Shippers Letter of Instruction (SLI) is a Form used by the shipper to authorize a carrier to issue a bill of lading or an air waybill on the shipper’s behalf. The form contains all details of the shipment and authorizes the carrier to sign the bill of lading in the name of the shipper.

specialized transportation equipment

Equipment for all types of products requiring specialized transportation moves.

standards

Standards are a degree or level of requirement, excellence, or attainment.

Wood crate and packaging standards for transportation cover some of the following; fabrication; closure; containers; cleats & cleated-plywood; fasteners, nails & staples; packaging; panel-boards & panels; skids & bases; marking; load, handling and impact tests; blocking, bracing & diagonal supports; strapping & securement; type, species, groups and strength of wood.

Company Standards: consensus among company employees and officers.

Industry Standards: consensus among the many companies and associations within the professional society. Such as wooden boxes, wood crate, and corrugated container manufacturers.

Government Standards: May reflect many degrees of consensus; some are written by individuals in government agencies, many are developed in the private sector and then adopted by reference as mandatory standards (wood boxes and crates are an example).

Mil-spec Standards: Military specifications and military standards as required by the Department of Defense (DOD) for regulating wood crates, wooden boxes, open crates, skid assemblies, pallets, saddles and cradles construction.

ASTM Standards: American Society for Testing and Materials applicable to the wood crating industry. The hierarchy comprises three basic levels: main committees (such as the D-10 Packaging Committee), subcommittees (such as the D10.26 Subcommittee on Shipping Containers, Crates, Pallets, Skids, and Related Structures), and tasks groups (such as the task groups on Wood Crates and Wood Boxes).

The resulting packaging as designed and built by your crating company may be of equal or better performance than would result from use of these specified standards for materials and procedures.

two day

The act of transporting cargo or freight for delivery or availability on the second business day; two day usually moves by air but may move by ground depending on the distance.

unpack and dunnage removal

The process of unpacking, removal and disposal of the packaging (dunnage) materials that were used to protect the cargo during transit, completed at the destination.

VCI

Vapor Corrosion Inhibitors release vapor into an enclosed package. The vapor mixes with all of the accessible air inside of the package, and then the VCI condense on the surface of the part and form a molecular corrosion inhibiting layer.

white glove (service)

White Glove Services are designed around your custom critical needs and may include the following services; same day pick-up, crating and packaging, transportation and delivery. The service may also include 2-man or additional manpower at the origin or destination, lift-gate, inside delivery, floor and room specific, stairs, specialized equipment, unpack and debris removal, and placement of the products.

WVB

Water Vapor Barrier foils are used to create air tight bags surrounding the product to protect the cargo from water and moisture.

wood crates

A wood crate is a structural framework of members fastened together to form a rigid enclosure, which protects the contents during handling, shipping and storage. The enclosure is usually of square or rectangular design and may or may not be sheathed. With design and structural criteria based on strength, transportation hazards, lumber, fasteners, and space for product requirements, the effective engineering of crates for specific purposes becomes effective.

WBENC

The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) certification for women-owned businesses is one of the most widely recognized and respected certifications in the nation. Accepted by over 700 major corporations across the country and a number of federal and government agencies, the WBENC certification expands your visibility among decision makers in corporate supplier diversity and procurement.

Helpful Tips for International Shipping